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Originally published November 7, 2012 at 10:47 AM | Page modified November 7, 2012 at 11:15 AM

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Market's performance the day after Election Day

How the stock market has behaved the day after recent presidential elections:

The Associated Press

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How the stock market has behaved the day after recent presidential elections:

- Nov. 5, 2008: Optimism about an Obama presidency, which had fueled a 305-point rally the day before, gives way to postelection nerves during the financial crisis. The Dow Jones industrial average falls 486 points, more than 5 percent, to 9,139.

- Nov. 3, 2004: Wall Street celebrates the re-election of George W. Bush with a solid rally. A concession by John Kerry ends fears that the election would be fought in the courts. The Dow climbs 101 to close at 10,137.05.

- Nov. 8, 2000: A choppy trading session amid extraordinary political uncertainty. The postelection fight heads for Florida, and the Dow falls 45 to 10,907.

- Nov. 6, 1996: Voters deliver two more years of divided government, re-electing President Bill Clinton and returning Republicans to control of Congress. With the economy humming, that's fine with investors. The Dow jumps 96 to 6,177.

- Nov. 4, 1992: Investors, having bid the market higher for a month in anticipation of a Clinton victory over President George H.W. Bush, cash in. The Dow falls 29 to 3,223.

- Nov. 9, 1988: A Republican victory fails to rally the market, and investors focus on problems for the new administration, specifically the trade deficit and a budget gap. The Dow drops nine to 2,118.

- Nov. 7, 1984: It may morning again in America, but something less than bright sun shines on Wall Street. The Dow falls 10 points - the equivalent of about 115 points today - to 1,233.

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