Skip to main content
Advertising

Originally published December 18, 2014 at 6:04 PM | Page modified December 19, 2014 at 6:25 AM

  • Share:
             
  • Comments
  • Print

RVs back on the road in recession rebound

During the deep economic downturn, some RV factories were shuttered and those that survived cut their workforce. The survivors are now reaping the benefits of market demand back in pre-recessionary territory.


The Associated Press

advertising

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — RV manufacturers have made up more ground since being sideswiped by the Great Recession, and production of the rolling homes is expected to return next year to levels seen before the economic downturn hit.

Overall recreational-vehicle shipments from manufacturers to dealers — a key measure of consumer demand — are expected to increase by nearly 4 percent to 361,400 units in 2015, the Recreation Vehicle Industry Association (RVIA) said Tuesday. Shipments totaled 353,400 units in 2007, the last year before sales tanked along with the economy.

Shipments to dealers’ lots in 2014 are forecast at 348,000 units, up 8.4 percent from the previous year, the group said. The momentum carried into the last half of this year with the strongest third-quarter shipments since 2007, it said. October sales reached a nearly 40-year high mark for the month.

“We are absolutely rolling,” RVIA President Richard Coon said at the start of an industry trade show in Louisville.

Industry leaders point to pent-up consumer demand, low interest rates, available credit and an improved economy for putting RV makers and dealers who survived the hard times back on the road to sustained growth. Falling fuel prices are another boost, they said.

“It’s hard not to call it boom times,” said Airstream President Bob Wheeler. “There seems to be a lot of dealer confidence and consumer confidence and a lot of forward momentum. ... When you look at the numbers, we’re really having a great run.”

Airstream’s workforce of about 470 has grown by about 200 employees in the past two years to keep up with demand, he said.

Industrywide demand is up for towable RVs and pricier stand-alone motor homes. This year’s shipments of towables are expected to pass 2007 figures, but motor-home sales still lag behind pre-recession figures, industry officials said.

During the deep economic downturn, some RV factories were shuttered and those that survived cut their workforce. The industry lost about a third of its manufacturers, dealers and suppliers during the recession. The survivors are now reaping the benefits of market demand back in pre-recessionary territory.

“The people that are in the industry-supplying product, marketing product today are making a lot more money,” Coon said.

Towables cost between $8,000 and $95,000, with an average price of about $29,000, according to the recreational-vehicle association. Stand-alone motor homes range from $45,000 to $1.5 million for the most luxurious, buslike vehicles. The average price is about $128,000 for the amenity-filled moving homes.

Coon urged dealers to be aggressive with their purchase orders to keep pace with consumer demand.

“Buy,” he said. “This is the time.”



Four weeks for 99 cents of unlimited digital access to The Seattle Times. Try it now!

Also in Business & Technology

News where, when and how you want it

Email Icon

 Subscribe today!

Subscribe today!

99¢ for four weeks of unlimited digital access.

Advertising

Advertising


Advertising
The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►