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Welcome to The Seattle Times' online letters to the editor, a sampling of readers' opinions. Join the conversation by commenting on these letters or send your own letter of up to 200 words letters@seattletimes.com.

May 11, 2010 at 4:00 PM

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Elena Kagan for Supreme Court

Posted by Letters editor

Making history, breaking ground

President Obama announced his choice of Solicitor General Elena Kagan to replace 90-year-old Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens, who announced his plan to retire later this year. [“Kagen would be vehicle for change,” page one, May 11.]

All the current Supreme Court justices have served as a federal judge before being nominated to the nation’s highest court. Kagan has not served in that capacity, nor has she been a judge at all.

It seems the president is more interested in placing someone on the bench who thinks like he does as opposed to someone willing to apply the law when making judicial decisions, which would affect millions of American citizens for generations.

While Kagan may have an impressive résumé and doubtlessly has an astute, legal mind, still, it is not known what her judicial philosophy is or how impartial she could be.

— Robert Randle, Tacoma

Kagen elite, not ordinary

What could Supreme Court Nominee Elena Kagan possibly know about ordinary people? She was educated at an elite high school, an elite college, an elite law school and Oxford University, with two federal court clerkships and teaching posts at elite law schools.

The rest of her work life was spent in elite jobs in Washington, D.C. She has no reason to know anything about ordinary people — unless of course, when President Obama says ordinary, he means those with a career path like Kagan’s, which is far from ordinary.

— Michael Bond, Seattle

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