Pacific Northwest MagazineMay 25, 2003seattletimes.com home
Home delivery
Search archive
Contact us
spacer
CONTENTS
spacer
COVER STORY
spacer
PLANT LIFE
spacer
TASTE
spacer
ON FITNESS
spacer
NORTHWEST LIVING
spacer
NOW & THEN
spacer
PREVIOUS ISSUES OF PACIFIC NW
spacer
spacer


WRITTEN BY VALERIE EASTON

Clippings: Snippets of news from the garden world
 
spacer Photo
PHOTO COURTESY OF SWIFT AND CO.
Native-plant landscaping around the Maple Valley Library has won praise from across the Atlantic Ocean. Britain's Gardens Illustrated magazine praised Seattle's Swift and Company for the design.
spacer
• Getting attention: We feel as if we're the center of the gardening universe here in the Northwest, and our "Fremont complex" has been reinforced lately by national and international attention.

Seattle-based landscape designer Kathryn Gustafson and her London office of Gustafson Porter received the commission to design the Princess Diana memorial in Hyde Park. The native-plant landscape surrounding the new Maple Valley Library, designed by Seattle landscape architects Swift and Company, was extolled in the British magazine Gardens Illustrated, which was impressed by the library's integration into the local ecosystem. And a recent glossy article in Garden Design magazine praises Richard Hartlage, of Dietz/Hartlage Landscape Architecture (his photos often appear with this column) for his design of inverted-pyramid-shaped pots for the arbor at Washington Park Arboretum. The massive pointed pots are manufactured from Umbrian clay by ColleZione (www.collezioneusa.com) and sell for $1,200 each.

• Honors, too: Awards have also showered down like spring rain on our corner of the country. The 2003 Scott medal was presented to Daniel Hinkley, director of Heronswood Nursery in Kingston, at Swarthmore College in March. This most prestigious of honors was awarded to Hinkley for his dedication to teaching, his plant exploration and his work introducing plants to the nursery trade, as well as for his writings and their impact on gardeners around the world. The American Horticultural Society honored another local light, Egon Molbak, at a banquet in Washington, D.C., last month. The Great American Gardener Award went to Molbak as founder in 1956 of Molbak's Nursery, which he grew from a small greenhouse into the 10-acre Woodinville complex that attracts more than a million visitors each year.
 
spacer spacer spacer
JULIE NOTARIANNI / THE SEATTLE TIMES
Illustration Now In Bloom
Coleus are versatile foliage annuals with lush leaves in a variety of shapes, colors and variegations. Few plants so quickly add an exotic, colorful touch to containers or border edges. Most coleus prefer shade, all need plenty of water and fertilizer. 'Inky Fingers' is subtle for a coleus, with duck-foot-shaped leaves in a delicious contrast of deep, chocolaty purple trimmed in mint green.
spacer
• Horticulture left hanging: On a less upbeat note, the gardening community is wondering and worrying about the University of Washington's Center for Urban Horticulture. Ground has not yet been broken to replace the complex's Merrill Hall, which was burned down by an ecoterrorist's firebomb in May 2001. The labs, library, offices and students remain displaced. The current estimate is for the new building to be completed by autumn 2004. (The federal government, after 9/11, rebuilt a significant part of the Pentagon in a year!) Other concerns are the College of Forest Resources' recommendation to eliminate the undergraduate horticultural curriculum. What sense does it make for the university to have a Center for Urban Horticulture but no course of horticultural studies? When students look for horticulture classes, all they'll find are random electives listed under Forestry. Then, Forest Resources proposed passing along a disproportionately large share of state budget cuts to the struggling center. There is one ray of hope: Sequim gardeners Orin and Ally Soest donated money to create an endowed directorship for the center and the Arboretum, and the search has started with the goal of having a new director by fall.

• Garden show a go: Due to the economy and unsettled political situation, attendance at this year's Northwest Flower & Garden Show dropped 9 percent to 73,000 people over five days. Show manager Lois Pendleton is unfazed, pointing out that the show remains the third-largest in the country. A mostly new and very enthusiastic team plans to strengthen the show's core attributes of display gardens, exhibits and seminars, and to green up and make inviting both sides of the Washington State Convention and Trade Center for next year's extravaganza, planned for Feb. 4-8.

• Bold but simple, it's the latest: Just to make sure you're garden-forward, here's a mercifully abbreviated list from the Garden Media Group on what's in and out for 2003: Bold colors, especially blue, are in and pastels are out; organic lawns are in and traditional lawn care is out; complicated is out and simple is in, and you'll be happy to know that instant gratification is out and real gardening is in. Why all this trend talk? Because gardening is big business. Eight out of 10 U.S. households participated in gardening activities last year; in 2001, lawn and garden sales totaled $37.7 billion.

Valerie Easton is a Seattle free-lance writer and contributing editor for Horticulture magazine. Her e-mail address is vjeaston@aol.com.

spacer
  PACIFIC NORTHWEST
 MAGAZINE SEARCH
Today Archive

Advanced search

 
advertising
spacer spacer spacer spacer spacer spacer spacer

seattletimes.com home
Home delivery | Contact us | Search archive | Site map | Low-graphic
NWclassifieds | NWsource | Advertising info | The Seattle Times Company

Copyright

Back to topBack to top