Pacific Northwest | November 9, 2003Pacific Northwest MagazineNovember 9, 2003seattletimes.com home
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CONTENTS
COVER STORY
PLANT LIFE
TASTE
ON FITNESS
NORTHWEST LIVING
NOW & THEN
SUNDAY PUNCH
LETTERS
PREVIOUS ISSUES OF PACIFIC NW


WRITTEN BY PAUL DORPAT

Linked to the Lake
Photo
COURTESY OF DORIS CLEMENTS
Home here to Kenmore Realty in the 1930s, this charming office survived on Bothell Way two lots north of 63rd Avenue Northeast until it was recently replaced by the Chinese restaurant shown in the contemporary photo.

 
 Photo
COURTESY OF JO ANN EVANS
THE PHOTOGRAPH of the Kenmore Realty Co. cabin office is one of about 130 illustrations included in "Kenmore by the Lake," the appealing community history published recently by the Kenmore Heritage Society and its principal historian, Priscilla Droge. The scene was recorded in 1934, and not long after, the cabin was moved to the north side of Bothell Way as it was being widened to four lanes.

John McMaster, its first mill owner, named Kenmore in 1901 for his former home in Kenmore, Ontario, but the ultimate source was the picturesque Scottish village of Kenmore on Lock Tay. Each year, our Kenmore embraces this nominal Scottish connection on its Jan. 10 Founder's Day and also in the summer during the "Good Ol' Days Festival."

Although incorporated as recently as 1998, Kenmore first really opened up in 1913 when the famously slippery red brick road was laid through it from Lake Forest Park to Bothell. After Kenmore real estate moved away, this cabin was home to a parade of Bothell Way enterprises, including the Violet Shop, a Japanese gift shop, the Aquarium and Tai Ho, the Chinese restaurant that recently replaced the cabin with the modern facility shown in the "now" view.

When Priscilla and Leonard Droge built their home in Kenmore's Uplake neighborhood in 1956 they paid $5,500 for a lot with a view of Lake Washington. This may be compared to the $200 "and Up" prices registered on the sign to the far left of the historical photo. As the sign claims, those were also upland "lake view lots" but at Depression-time prices.

On Nov. 30, at 5 p.m., Priscilla Droge will be signing her book at Third Place Books in Lake Forest Park.

Paul Dorpat specializes in historical photography and has published several books on early Seattle.

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